Coxing in high stream

Date of Email29th Apr 2012Sent By:Matthew Maton-Howarth <captainofcoxes@gmail[dot]com>
--485b39618d12aed6ac04bec5acdc
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Hi,

When the rain stops and the flag begins to be lowered through amber, blue
and back to green there will be challenging coxing conditions. If you know
how to deal with the stream then cool, but I thought I'd try to compile a
few general and specific points for how coxes may deal best with the stream
on the Isis.

 1. Stay calm and in control, and remember that if you are on the bank and
feel uncomfortable, or do boat and feel uncomfortable with the conditions
then it is absolutely not a sign of being a bad cox to abandon the outing.
In fact quite the opposite, it takes a good cox to know their limitations.

2. You will need to leave plenty of room to make the manoeuvres you
normally would going downstream. This is particularly relevant into and
through the gut going DOWNstream. You will be pushed into the outside of
the corners, particularly noticeably today was being driven into the
Longbridges branches of the river. Stay in the transit lane and try not to
be pulled into these streams by using bowside pressure where necessary.
Similarly, once into the gut you will feel the boat being strongly pulled
onto the wrong side of the river. UPstream crews, just be aware of crews
that may be struggling, and if going downstream use pressure to stick to
the starboard bank.

3. Queuing for spinning at the head will be made tricky by crews that are
spinning being dragged downstream perpendicular to the river. My advice
would be to leave plenty of room for spinning crews at the head. When
spinning you will appear to be moving perpendicularly down the river. Don't
panic, just ask the rowers to be efficient and use more backing-down if
needed to avoid the drift.

4. In high stream the speed of the river toward the central will result in
a tendency to spin the boat. Stay switched on particularly when being
coached and be ready to use the crew to keep you parallel to the stream.

5. Remember that when heading UPstream (i.e. towards the HoR pub) you want
to keep tucked well into the bank as this is where the stream is minimised.
Additionally, why not try pointing the bows of the boat slightly towards
the bank as this will further help oppose the effect of the stream
attempting to spin the boat.

6. As many of you may have noticed today there is a substantial amount of
debris being brought downstream into the Isis stretch of river. Some of
this debris is fairly significant. Please try to avoid for your own safety.

Very best as always
Matt

----
Matthew Maton-Howarth
OURCs Captain of Coxes 2011-2012


---------------------------------------
Purchase your rowing stash from SHIRTWORKS on Cowley Road.
Email shop@shirtworks.co.uk or call 01865 251 944
---------------------------------------------------------------------

--485b39618d12aed6ac04bec5acdc
Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi,

When the rain stops and the flag begins to be lowered through amber, blue and back to green there will be challenging coxing conditions. If you know how to deal with the stream then cool, but I thought I'd try to compile a few general and specific points for how coxes may deal best with the stream on the Isis.

=A01. Stay calm and in control, and remember that if you are on the bank and feel uncomfortable, or do boat and feel uncomfortable with the conditions then it is absolutely not a sign of being a bad cox to abandon the outing. In fact quite the opposite, it takes a good cox to know their limitations.

2. You will need to leave plenty of room to make the manoeuvres you normally would going downstream. This is particularly relevant into and through the gut going DOWNstream. You will be pushed into the outside of the corners, particularly noticeably today was being driven into the Longbridges branches of the river. Stay in the transit lane and try not to be pulled into these streams by using bowside pressure where necessary. Similarly, once into the gut you will feel the boat being strongly pulled onto the wrong side of the river. UPstream crews, just be aware of crews that may be struggling, and if going downstream use pressure to stick to the starboard bank.

3. Queuing for spinning at the head will be made tricky by crews that are spinning being dragged downstream perpendicular to the river. My advice would be to leave plenty of room for spinning crews at the head. When spinning you will appear to be moving perpendicularly down the river. Don't panic, just ask the rowers to be efficient and use mor= e backing-down if needed to avoid the drift.

4. In high stream the speed of the river toward the central will result in a tendency to spin the boat. Stay switched on particularly when being coached and be ready to use the crew to keep you parallel to the stream.

5. Remember that when heading UPstream (i.e. towards the HoR pub) you want to keep tucked well into the bank as this is where the stream is minimised. Additionally, why not try pointing the bows of the boat slightly towards the bank as this will further help oppose the effect of the stream attempting to spin the boat.

6. As many of you may have noticed today there is a substantial amount of debris being brought downstream into the Isis stretch of river. Some of this debris is fairly significant. Please try to avoid for your own safety.

Very best as always
Matt

----
Matthew Maton-Howarth
OUR= Cs Captain of Coxes 2011-2012

=A0
---------------------------------------
Purchase your rowing stash = from SHIRTWORKS on Cowley Road.
Email shop@shirtworks.co.uk or call 01865 251 944 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
=
--485b39618d12aed6ac04bec5acdc--

Return to Email Archive